Bond Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Bond Fund'

A fund invested primarily in bonds and other debt instruments. The exact type of debt the fund invests in will depend on its focus, but investments may include government, corporate, municipal and convertible bonds, along with other debt securities like mortgage-backed securities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Fund'

For investors interested in bonds, a Morningstar bond style box can be used to sort out the investing options available for bond funds. Investors should note that U.S. government bonds are considered to be of the highest credit quality and are not subject to ratings.


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