Bond Market

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DEFINITION of 'Bond Market'

The environment in which the issuance and trading of debt securities occurs. The bond market primarily includes government-issued securities and corporate debt securities, and facilitates the transfer of capital from savers to the issuers or organizations requiring capital for government projects, business expansions and ongoing operations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Market'

Most trading in the bond market occurs over-the-counter, through organized electronic trading networks, and is composed of the primary market (through which debt securities are issued and sold by borrowers to lenders) and the secondary market (through which investors buy and sell previously issued debt securities amongst themselves). Although the stock market often commands more media attention, the bond market is actually many times bigger and is vital to the ongoing operation of the public and private sector.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Who are the key players in the bond market?

    The bond market can essentially be broken down into three main groups: issuers, underwriters and purchasers. The issuers ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do low interest rates cause investors to shy away from the bond market?

    The lower rates that are found on bonds, especially government-backed bonds, are often not seen as enough by investors. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where can I get bond market quotes?

    Getting bond quotes and general information about a bond issue is considerably more difficult than researching a stock or ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the most effective ways to reduce moral hazard?

    There are a number of ways to reduce moral hazard, including the offering of incentives, policies to prevent immoral behavior ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between compounding interest and simple interest?

    Interest is the cost of borrowing money, where the borrower pays a fee to the owner for using the owner's money. The interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the relationship between modified duration and interest rates?

    Modified duration is a formula that measures the value of a bond in relation to changes in interest rates. Modified duration ... Read Full Answer >>
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