What is a 'Bond Swap'

A bond swap consists of selling one debt instrument in order to use the proceeds to purchase another debt instrument. Investors engage in bond swapping with the goal of improving their financial positions. Bond swapping can reduce an investor's tax liability, give an investor a higher rate of return or help an investor to diversify a portfolio. The pure yield pickup swap and the tax swap are two common bond-swapping strategies.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bond Swap'

For example, selling a bond at a loss and using the proceeds of the sale to buy a different bond with better performance is a type of bond swap. This swap has two potential benefits: the investor can write-off the losses from the bond he or she sold to lower their tax liability, and they can potentially earn a better return with the newly purchased bond.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Read about interest rate swaps and why these transactions are performed by institutional actors in the bond market, not individual ... Read Answer >>
  2. When was the first swap agreement and why were swaps created?

    Learn about the history of swap agreements, the first swap agreement between IBM and the World Bank, and how swaps have evolved ... Read Answer >>
  3. Can individual investors profit from interest rate swaps?

    Find out how individual investors can speculate on interest rate movements through interest rate swaps by trading fixed rate ... Read Answer >>
  4. Do interest rate swaps trade on the open market?

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  5. How are swap agreements financed?

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