What is a 'Bond Swap'

A bond swap consists of selling one debt instrument in order to use the proceeds to purchase another debt instrument. Investors engage in bond swapping with the goal of improving their financial positions. Bond swapping can reduce an investor's tax liability, give an investor a higher rate of return or help an investor to diversify a portfolio. The pure yield pickup swap and the tax swap are two common bond-swapping strategies.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bond Swap'

For example, selling a bond at a loss and using the proceeds of the sale to buy a different bond with better performance is a type of bond swap. This swap has two potential benefits: the investor can write-off the losses from the bond he or she sold to lower their tax liability, and they can potentially earn a better return with the newly purchased bond.

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