What is a 'Bond Swap'

A bond swap consists of selling one debt instrument in order to use the proceeds to purchase another debt instrument. Investors engage in bond swapping with the goal of improving their financial positions. Bond swapping can reduce an investor's tax liability, give an investor a higher rate of return or help an investor to diversify a portfolio. The pure yield pickup swap and the tax swap are two common bond-swapping strategies.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bond Swap'

For example, selling a bond at a loss and using the proceeds of the sale to buy a different bond with better performance is a type of bond swap. This swap has two potential benefits: the investor can write-off the losses from the bond he or she sold to lower their tax liability, and they can potentially earn a better return with the newly purchased bond.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What would motivate an entity to enter into a swap agreement?

    Learn why parties enter into swap agreements to hedge their risks, and understand how the different legs of a swap agreement ... Read Answer >>
  2. Can bond traders trade on interest rate swaps?

    Read about interest rate swaps and why these transactions are performed by institutional actors in the bond market, not individual ... Read Answer >>
  3. When was the first swap agreement and why were swaps created?

    Learn about the history of swap agreements, the first swap agreement between IBM and the World Bank, and how swaps have evolved ... Read Answer >>
  4. Can individual investors profit from interest rate swaps?

    Find out how individual investors can speculate on interest rate movements through interest rate swaps by trading fixed rate ... Read Answer >>
  5. How are swap agreements financed?

    Learn how swap agreements are now cleared by swap execution facilities and require the use of collateral margin to hold, ... Read Answer >>
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