Boomernomics

DEFINITION of 'Boomernomics'

An investing strategy that involves buying equities directly related to the spending behavior of baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964).

BREAKING DOWN 'Boomernomics'

Areas such as biotech, healthcare and luxury cars are the kinds of companies that stand to benefit from this age group. People using the boomernomics investing strategy also invest in companies that offer products such as motor homes or dentures, which are geared toward aging or retiring consumers.

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