Boomlet

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Boomlet'

A small but sharp increase in business activity, political activity or birth rates in a particular region over a certain period of time. Where a boom is considered a period of vigorous growth and prosperity, a boomlet can be regarded as a mini-boom. A boomlet has the same business, political or growth rate activity as a regular boom, but to a lesser degree. A boomlet may be a smaller or less enduring trend when compared to a traditional boom.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Boomlet'

A boomlet is a small boom. In the stock market, a boomlet is associated with a temporary but sustained increase in prices, or a period of buying and rising prices (as opposed to a bust, or a bear market with falling prices). An example of a boomlet is the 2% increase in the U.S. fertility rate during 2005 and 2006. In 2006, birth rates in the U.S. stabilized the population for the first time since 1971.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Population

    The entire pool from which a statistical sample is drawn. The ...
  2. Boom

    A period of time during which sales of a product or business ...
  3. Statistics

    A type of mathematical analysis involving the use of quantified ...
  4. Crash

    A sudden and significant decline in the value of a market. A ...
  5. Bubble

    1. An economic cycle characterized by rapid expansion followed ...
  6. Mobile First Strategy

    Mobile first strategy is trend in website development where designing ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the Basel III rules, and how does it impact my bank investments?

    The Basel III rules are a regulatory framework designed to strengthen financial institutions by placing guidelines pertaining ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What advantages do corporations have over privately held companies?

    The chief advantage that most publicly traded corporations enjoy – and the primary reason why private companies decide to ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are labor and capital affected by the balance of trade?

    The balance of trade, or BOT, the net of exports and imports for a given country, also known as the current account, is a ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Where did the term "capitalism" come from?

    The term capitalism originates from the Latin word capitalis," which literally means "head of cattle." Capitalis comes from ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some examples of Cash Flow from Financing (CFF)?

    The cash flow statement is a financial statement showing the net change in cash for a company in a given period. Entries ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can retail investors buy commercial paper?

    Retail investors can buy commercial paper. However, buying commercial paper is subject to a significant number of restrictions ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Using Historical Volatility To Gauge Future Risk

    Use these calculations to uncover the risk involved in your investments.
  2. Investing

    Battered Stocks That Bounce Back

    Companies with falling revenues can be profitable, but choose them with care.
  3. Investing

    Wizards Of Odd: A Trip To Tech Land

    I spent a couple of days in Silicon Valley, and here are some key lessons I learned after meeting with a number of tech CEOs and venture capitalist.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Which ETF is the Best Bet: VTI or IWV?

    A look at two quality ETFs that offer diversification, low expense ratios, and exposure to the total market.
  5. Professionals

    What is a SWOT Analysis?

    SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. SWOT analysis is a management tool used to identify strategies for success. It may be used to guide individual thinking, group ...
  6. Economics

    An Introduction to Government Loans

    Government loans further policymakers' efforts to create positive social outcomes by offering timely access to capital for qualified candidates.
  7. Markets

    Capital Markets

    Capital Markets are financial markets where organizations that need money for productive long-term purposes.
  8. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Spotting A Market Bottom

    Recognizing a market bottom can lead to huge opportunities for an investor. We go over how you can spot the bottom so that you can reap the rewards.
  9. Economics

    Introduction To Asian Financial Markets

    We look at the history of Asia's financial development and how investors can get involved in these growing markets.
  10. Active Trading

    Get Positive Earnings In The Negative-Sum Market

    Gain an advantage in the markets by understanding how to win in a negative-sum game.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center