Boomlet

DEFINITION of 'Boomlet'

A small but sharp increase in business activity, political activity or birth rates in a particular region over a certain period of time. Where a boom is considered a period of vigorous growth and prosperity, a boomlet can be regarded as a mini-boom. A boomlet has the same business, political or growth rate activity as a regular boom, but to a lesser degree. A boomlet may be a smaller or less enduring trend when compared to a traditional boom.

BREAKING DOWN 'Boomlet'

A boomlet is a small boom. In the stock market, a boomlet is associated with a temporary but sustained increase in prices, or a period of buying and rising prices (as opposed to a bust, or a bear market with falling prices). An example of a boomlet is the 2% increase in the U.S. fertility rate during 2005 and 2006. In 2006, birth rates in the U.S. stabilized the population for the first time since 1971.

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