Borrowing Base

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DEFINITION of 'Borrowing Base'

The amount of money a lender will loan to a company based on the value of the collateral the company pledges. The borrowing base is usually determined by a method called margining, where the lender determines a discount factor that is multiplied by the value of the collateral; the result is the amount that will be loaned to the company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Borrowing Base'

For example, if company X goes to a lender to borrow money, the lender will assess the company's strengths and weaknesses and evaluate the lender's risk. Based on the risk the lending company feels is associated with lending money to company X, a discount factor is determined, say 85%. If company X is offering collateral that is worth $100,000, the amount the lending company will give the company is equal to 85% of $100,000, or $85,000.

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