Bottomry

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bottomry'

When the owner of a ship borrows money and uses the ship itself (referring to the ship's bottom or keel) as collateral. If the ship is lost during the course of the voyage then the creditor will lose on the loan; if the ship survives, the lender will receive the principal plus interest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bottomry'

The interest received by the lender on a bottomry loan is referred to as "maritime interest", and can be higher than the legal rate of interest. Unlike a typical loan in which the borrower is liable for the debt at all times, a bottomry contract makes the lender liable for the loan because it will not receive money if the ship is lost.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  2. Maritime Law

    A body of laws, conventions and treaties that governs international ...
  3. Builders Risk Hull Insurance

    A protection policy pertaining to when a ship is in the builders' ...
  4. Barratry

    An illegal act whereby an attorney instigates a dispute or otherwise ...
  5. Collateral

    Property or other assets that a borrower offers a lender to secure ...
  6. Welfare Capitalism

    Definition of welfare capitalism.
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Insurance Coverage: A Business Necessity

    Don't go to work without this policy in place - especially if your work is in your home.
  2. Home & Auto

    Cover Your Company With Liability Insurance

    Every business is susceptible to legal action. Find out how to protect yours.
  3. Entrepreneurship

    Will Insurance Keep Your Business Safe?

    Skilled employees are key to a successful business. Find out how to avoid a financial setback if they leave.
  4. Home & Auto

    5 Insurance Policies Everyone Should Have

    Insurance policies come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Shop carefully and the right policies will go a long way towards helping you protect your assets.
  5. Investing

    Bill of Exchange

    A bill of exchange is a document used in international trade to pay for goods or services. It is signed by the person promising to pay, and given to the person entitled to receive the money. ...
  6. Economics

    Can state and local governments in the US run fiscal deficits?

    Discover why most state and local governments do not – or cannot – run fiscal deficits in the same manner as the U.S. federal government.
  7. Active Trading Fundamentals

    How do central bank decisions affect volatility?

    Using an aggregate, macroeconomic perspective, take a look at how some of the ways central bank decisions can impact market volatility.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What does the term 'invisible hand' refer to in the economy?

    Discover and understand the concept of the "invisible hand" as explained by Adam Smith, considered the founder of modern economic theory.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    At what level is the current account deficit considered excessive, in terms of percent?

    Take a deeper look at the variables that impact current account deficits, and learn why not all types of deficits have equal impacts on a nation's economy.
  10. Personal Finance

    How is the consumer price index (CPI) used in market escalation contracts?

    Understand the purpose of market escalation contracts and learn how the consumer price index (CPI) is often used to make periodic contract price adjustments.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  2. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  3. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
  4. Break-Even Analysis

    An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even ...
  5. Key Performance Indicators - KPI

    A set of quantifiable measures that a company or industry uses to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting their ...
  6. Bank Guarantee

    A guarantee from a lending institution ensuring that the liabilities of a debtor will be met. In other words, if the debtor ...
Trading Center