Bounty

DEFINITION of 'Bounty'

  1. A generous amount of something.
  2. A reward for capturing or even killing an undesirable person.
  3. A sum paid by a government to reward certain activities or behavior, such as reaching a predefined economic goal or performing a public service.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bounty'

  1. An abundance of fresh produce, for example, is commonly referred to as "the season's bounty" or "nature's bounty."
  2. Someone who makes a living by locating wanted persons is called a bounty hunter. A bounty hunter might track down someone who skips bail and get paid a percentage of the bail when they catch the criminal.
  3. Some governments might offer a bounty to an individual who enlists in that country's armed forces (this is illegal in the United States, however).
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