Bounty

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bounty'

  1. A generous amount of something.
  2. A reward for capturing or even killing an undesirable person.
  3. A sum paid by a government to reward certain activities or behavior, such as reaching a predefined economic goal or performing a public service.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bounty'

  1. An abundance of fresh produce, for example, is commonly referred to as "the season's bounty" or "nature's bounty."
  2. Someone who makes a living by locating wanted persons is called a bounty hunter. A bounty hunter might track down someone who skips bail and get paid a percentage of the bail when they catch the criminal.
  3. Some governments might offer a bounty to an individual who enlists in that country's armed forces (this is illegal in the United States, however).
RELATED TERMS
  1. Rational Behavior

    A decision-making process that is based on making choices that ...
  2. Behavioral Economics

    The study of psychology as it relates to the economic decision ...
  3. Profit

    A financial benefit that is realized when the amount of revenue ...
  4. Market Psychology

    The overall sentiment or feeling that the market is experiencing ...
  5. Risk/Reward Ratio

    A ratio used by many investors to compare the expected returns ...
  6. Media Effect

    A theory that relates how stories published in the media influence ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are there special benefits for U.S. armed forces personnel?

    If you are a member of the military, you may be afforded special tax benefits that might not be available to other taxpayers. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a company decide which key performance indicators (KPIs) to use?

    A company's key performance indicators (KPIs) should be considered specific success metrics for that individual company. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is an available seat mile in the airline industry?

    One airline seat available for sale and flown one mile equals one available seat mile (ASM) in the airline industry. A primary ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Under what circumstances is short selling advisable?

    The practice of selling a stock short only makes sense when the investor anticipates the share price will subsequently drop. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the differences between a change in accounting principle and a change in ...

    One area where the Fair Accounting Standards Board, the FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, the IASB, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the differences between gross profit and net income?

    When preparing either an income statement or an income tax return for a business, accountants provide calculations for both ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Handcuffs And Smoking Guns: The Criminal Elements Of Wall Street

    From godfathers to perps, familiarize yourself with the "criminal elements" creeping around Wall Street.
  2. Taxes

    Winning The Jackpot: Dream Or Financial Nightmare?

    Don't assume all prizes are free. Many come with enough costs to render them worthless.
  3. Economics

    What is Systematic Sampling?

    Systematic sampling is similar to random sampling, but it uses a pattern for the selection of the sample.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Expected Return

    The expected return is a tool used to determine whether or not an investment has a positive or negative average net outcome.
  5. Economics

    Explaining PFIs and PPPs

    Public-private partnerships (PPP) and Private Finance Initiative (PFI) are two business relationships between government agencies and private businesses.
  6. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Standard Error

    Standard error is a statistical term that measures the accuracy with which a sample represents a population.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Tangible Net Worth

    Tangible net worth is determined by taking total assets, then subtracting liabilities and intangible assets.
  9. Stock Analysis

    What is the Price-to-Sales Ratio?

    The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the value placed on each dollar of a company’s sales or revenues.
  10. Budgeting

    5 Smart Tips For Raising Financially Literate Kids

    Help your children learn to be financially literate with these strategies. Financial savvy begins with what they learn from their parents.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center