Bracket Creep

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DEFINITION of 'Bracket Creep'

A situation where inflation pushes income into higher tax brackets. The result is an increase in income taxes but no increase in real purchasing power.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bracket Creep'

This is a problem during periods of high inflation as income tax codes typically take a longer time to change.

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