Branch Accounting


DEFINITION of 'Branch Accounting'

An accounting system in which separate accounts are maintained for each branch of a corporate entity or organization. The primary objectives of branch accounting are better accountability and control, since profitability and efficiency can be closely tracked at the branch level.

BREAKING DOWN 'Branch Accounting'

Branch accounting may involve added expenses for an organization in terms of accounting and infrastructure. This is because it may be necessary to appoint branch accountants to ensure accurate financial reporting and compliance with head office procedures and processes.

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  1. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>

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