Branch Office

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DEFINITION of 'Branch Office'

A location, other than the main office, where business is conducted. Most branch offices are comprised of smaller divisions of different aspects of the company such as human resources, marketing, accounting, etc. A branch office will typically have a branch manager who will report directly to, and take orders from, a management member of the main office.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Branch Office'

Branch offices are useful in that it allows the administrative aspect of the business to be conducted in locations around the globe. For example, Starbucks has branch offices so as to be able to meet closely with the stores district managers in a more cost effective manner, as well as cater to, and be more informed in, the needs of specific locations.

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