Brand Extension

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DEFINITION of 'Brand Extension'

A common method of launching a new product by using an existing brand name on a new product in a different category. A company using brand extension hopes to leverage its existing customer base and brand loyalty to increase its profits with a new product offering.


For brand extension to be successful, there usually must be some logical association between the original product and the new one. A weak or nonexistent association can result in brand dilution. Also, if a brand extension is unsuccessful, it can harm the parent brand.

BREAKING DOWN 'Brand Extension'

The following are all examples of brand extension:


Starbucks coffee company creating Starbucks ice cream, to be sold not at Starbucks retail stores but in grocery stores. The ice cream flavors were based on the flavors of frappucinos Starbucks sold in its coffee shops.


Quaker, a popular oatmeal producer, creating Quaker granola bars, also made with oatmeal.


Celebrity homemaker Martha Stewart creating the Martha Stewart Home Collection of products such as bathroom accessories and bedding.

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