Brand Loyalty

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DEFINITION of 'Brand Loyalty'

When consumers become committed to your brand and make repeat purchases over time. Brand loyalty is a result of consumer behavior and is affected by a person's preferences. Loyal customers will consistently purchase products from their preferred brands, regardless of convenience or price. Companies will often use different marketing strategies to cultivate loyal customers, be it is through loyalty programs (i.e. rewards programs) or trials and incentives (ex. samples and free gifts).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brand Loyalty'

Companies that successfully cultivate loyal customers also develop brand ambassadors – consumers that will market a certain brand and talk positively about it among their friends. This is free word-of-mouth marketing for the company and is often very effective.

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