Brand Personality

DEFINITION of 'Brand Personality'

A set of human characteristics that are attributed to a brand name. A brand personality is something to which the consumer can relate, and an effective brand will increase its brand equity by having a consistent set of traits. This is the added-value that a brand gains, aside from its functional benefits. There are five main types of brand personalities: excitement, sincerity, ruggedness, competence and sophistication.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brand Personality'

Customers are more likely to purchase a brand if its personality is similar to their own. Examples of traits for the different types of brand personalities:


Excitement: carefree, spirited, youthful
Sincerity: genuine, kind, family-oriented, thoughtful
Ruggedness: rough, tough, outdoors, athletic
Competence: successful, accomplished, influential, a leader
Sophistication: elegant, prestigious, pretentious

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