Brazil ETF

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DEFINITION of 'Brazil ETF'

An exchange-traded fund that invests in Brazilian stocks, either through local stock exchanges or with American and global depositary receipts on European and U.S. stock exchanges. Brazil ETFs are passively managed and are based on a country index created by fund managers, or a widely followed third party index.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brazil ETF'

Brazil ETFs might be overweight in certain sectors compared to a diversified U.S. fund like a S&P 500 fund. For example in 2008, the Brazilian economy is strong in areas like natural resource production and finance, but weaker in areas like healthcare, technology and consumer goods. Brazil's economy is considered vibrant in the world market, leading to its inclusion in the "BRIC" group along with Russia, India and China. As the country's financial markets open up to increased foreign investment, ETF choices should expand.

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