Breadwinner

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Breadwinner'

The primary, or sole, income earner in a household. Breadwinners, by contributing the largest portion of household income, generally cover most household expenses and financially support their dependents.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Breadwinner'

The term breadwinner is most often used to refer to single income families in which one of the members works to generate income and the other stays at home to care for dependents. The term is based on the word "bread", which is slang for money.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Income

    Money that an individual or business receives in exchange for ...
  2. Immediate Family

    A person's smallest family unit, consisting of the closest relatives, ...
  3. Dependent

    An individual whom a taxpayer can claim for credits and/or exemptions. ...
  4. Gross Income

    1. An individual's total personal income before taking taxes ...
  5. Household Income

    The combined gross income of all the members of a household who ...
  6. Debt-To-Income Ratio - DTI

    A personal finance measure that compares an individual's debt ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Do I need to file an income tax return every year?

    Contrary to popular belief, there are indeed situations where a person does not need to file a tax return every year. For ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does revolving credit differ from a general line of credit?

    The average American consumer earning a median salary of approximately $50,000 a year spends approximately $15,000 to $16, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between the income effect and the price effect?

    The price effect is the impact on the market based on how the consumer is spending money as a result of the income effect. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What effect does the income effect have on my business?

    The income effect may have positive or negative consequences on a small business, depending on many factors. The income effect ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between the substitution effect and the income effect?

    The substitution effect refers to consumers spending money on items of lower value, while the income effect refers to how ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does deflation impact consumers?

    Deflation impacts consumers positively in the short term but negatively in the long term. In the short term, deflation essentially ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Relationship Money Matters

    Whether married, single or somewhere in between, you'll face unique financial challenges.
  2. Personal Finance

    Are We Losing The Middle Class?

    Find out where your income and lifestyle put you compared to the national average.
  3. Budgeting

    Kids Or Cash: The Modern Marriage Dilemma

    It now costs nearly $300,000 to raise a child for 18 years. Are you sure you're up for it?
  4. Investing

    Why Some Investors Are Tilting Toward TIPS

    Last month’s five-year TIPS auction drew nearly $48 billion in interest, a sign of recent renewed demand for this inflation indexed asset among investors.
  5. Economics

    The Big Chill: What’s Wrong With The U.S. Consumer

    Based on the most recent April data, investors may, once again, be disappointed when the second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) report comes in.
  6. Personal Finance

    Are You In The Top One Percent Of The World?

    If you live in an industrialized country, cracking the top one percent of income earners isn't as difficult as you might think.
  7. Investing Basics

    Explaining Fixed Income

    A person living off a fixed income is usually a retiree receiving a fixed, steady monthly inflow of cash.
  8. Insurance

    Explaining Insurance

    Insurance is a form of contract between an individual and an insurance company that spreads risk in exchange for premium payments.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Marginal Propensity to Consume

    The marginal propensity to consume is a measure of how much consumption changes when income changes.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Top US Housing Market Indicators

    A quick overview of the top economic indicators to track the housing market in the US.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center