Breakeven Yield

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DEFINITION of 'Breakeven Yield'

The yield required to cover the cost of marketing a banking product or service. Breakeven yield is the point at which the money brought in from the sale of a product or service is equal to the cost of marketing the product or services. The breakeven point is the point at which no profit or loss is being derived.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Breakeven Yield'

Breakeven yield allows a decision-maker to have knowledge about the minimum volume yield required to earn a specific rate of return on a product or service.



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