Breakup Fee

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DEFINITION of 'Breakup Fee'

A common fee used in takeover agreements if the seller backs out of a deal to sell to the purchaser. A breakup fee, or termination fee, is required to compensate the prospective purchaser for the time and resources used to facilitate the deal. Breakup fees are normally 1-3% of the deal's value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Breakup Fee'

A company might pay a breakup fee if it decides not to sell to the original purchaser and instead sells to a competing bidder with a more attractive offer. Sometimes a breakup fee can discourage other companies from bidding on the company because they would have to bid a price that covers the breakup fee.

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