Bribe

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DEFINITION of 'Bribe'

An illegal payment from one party to another, usually in return for a legal or financial favor. Bribes are often made to public officials or heads of other regulatory agencies in order to escape legal convictions or unfavorable rulings, or as an incentive for the payee to bend or overlook pertinent regulations that would otherwise restrict the payer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bribe'

Bribes and kickbacks of any kind are, obviously, nondeductible. Bribes that take the form of kickbacks to insurance or securities customers are known as rebating, and can result in disciplinary actions by the regulatory authorities.

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