Bridge Bank

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DEFINITION of 'Bridge Bank'

A bank authorized to hold the assets and liabilities of another bank, specifically an insolvent bank. A bridge bank is charged with continuing the operations of the insolvent bank until the bank becomes solvent through acquisition by another entity or through liquidation. A bridge bank can be a national bank or a federal savings association chartered or appointed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bridge Bank'

The FDIC was given authority to charter these temporary banks by the Competitive Equality Banking Act of 1987. The FDIC has the authority, using a bridge bank, to operate a failed bank for up to three years until a buyer can be found.

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