Brinkmanship

Filed Under:
Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Brinkmanship'


A negotiating technique in which one party aggressively pursues a set of terms ostensibly to the point at which the other party in the negotiation must either agree or halt negotiations. Brinkmanship is so named because one party pushes the other to the "brink" or edge of what that party is willing to accommodate. As a sales strategy, brinkmanship is most often used with new customers and requires the salesman to identify and attack the customer's "pain points".

Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Brinkmanship'


Companies pursuing a brinkmanship approach to negotiating may be bluffing, as they would be willing to accept terms more agreeable to the other party. It is a risky approach in that it may alienate the other party and cause a failure in negotiations in which no party does business. The rewards are potentially greater than a more amiable negotiation, since the more aggressive is more likely to gain better terms if the process is successful.

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  2. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  3. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  4. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  5. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  6. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
Trading Center