British Columbia Securities Commission

DEFINITION of 'British Columbia Securities Commission'

The independent government agency responsible for the regulation of securities trading in British Columbia, Canada. The British Columbia Securities Commission is located in Vancouver, British Columbia, and aims to protect and promote the public interest in the securities markets by ensuring that securities traded within BC are done so fairly and with the public's best interests in mind. Additionally the BCSC actively engages in the promotion of a competitive and transparent securities marketplace in British Columbia.

BREAKING DOWN 'British Columbia Securities Commission'

The British Columbia Securities Commission's enabling legislation was the Securities Act, RSBC 1996, c. 418 which gave the Commission regulatory permissions over the securities market in British Columbia. The BCSC also works in collection with other regulatory throughout Canada, the United States and globally to ensure to integrity of the markets in support of investor confidence and protection.

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