Broad Evidence Rule


DEFINITION of 'Broad Evidence Rule'

A rule outlining the guidelines insurers must go about determining the value of lost, stolen or damaged property. The broad evidence rule does not specify any one method to value any one piece of property, only that the means which most accurately displays the true cash value of the property will be used.

BREAKING DOWN 'Broad Evidence Rule'

The broad evidence rule is used by insurance companies to determine the cash value to be paid out to the insured in the event of a claim. As opposed to using the traditional cash value (replacement cost minus depreciation), the broad evidence rule can take into account such factors as the age of the property, its tax value and any possible profits the item may have accrued.

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