Broad Money


DEFINITION of 'Broad Money'

In economics, broad money refers to the most inclusive definition of the money supply. Since cash can be exchanged for many different financial instruments and placed in various restricted accounts, it is not a simple task for economists to define how much money is currently in the economy. Therefore, the money supply is measured in many different ways. Broad money is used colloquially to refer to a broad definition of the money supply.


In the U.S. the most common measures of the money supply are termed M0, M1, M2 and M3. These measurements vary according to the liquidity of the accounts included. M0 includes only the most liquid instruments, and is therefore narrowest definition of money. M3 includes includes liquid instruments as well as some less liquid instruments and is therefore considered the broadest measurement of money. Complicating the situation, different countries often define their measurements of the money slightly differently. In academic settings, the term "broad money" should be separately defined in order to prevent potential misunderstandings.

  1. M3

    A measure of money supply that includes M2 as well as large time ...
  2. M1

    A measure of the money supply that includes all physical money, ...
  3. M2

    A measure of money supply that includes cash and checking deposits ...
  4. Narrow Money

    A category of money supply that includes all physical money like ...
  5. Money Supply

    The entire stock of currency and other liquid instruments in ...
  6. Money

    An officially-issued legal tender generally consisting of currency ...
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