Brokerage Supervisor

A A A

DEFINITION

A brokerage company employee who appoints, trains and manages brokers and who sells the company's products to those brokers, who then sell them to clients. The brokerage supervisor must also ensure company service standards and manage workflow processes. Brokerage supervisors can work in several fields, as several different types of businesses use the brokerage company format, including insurance, real estate and financial products.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

A good brokerage supervisor should have attention to detail, solid mathematical skills, an accounting background, leadership ability, strong customer service skills and previous experience with commission sales.

Some brokerage supervisors who fail to properly supervise their brokers (such as by conducting formal annual audits) and who fail to establish and/or enforce the insurance company's policies are subject to enforcement action by the Securities and Exchange commission if the broker engages in fraud. Such enforcement actions may include fines and being barred from holding a supervisor position in the insurance and financial industry.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Brokerage Company

    A business whose main responsibility is to be an intermediary that puts buyers ...
  2. Agent

    1. An individual or firm that places securities transactions for clients. 2. ...
  3. Commission

    A service charge assessed by a broker or investment advisor in return for providing ...
  4. Risk

    The chance that an investment's actual return will be different than expected. ...
  5. Broker

    1. An individual or firm that charges a fee or commission for executing buy ...
  6. Insurance

    A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives financial protection ...
  7. Agency Broker

    A broker that acts as an agent to its clients. When acting as the agent, the ...
  8. Insurance Underwriter

    A financial professional that evaluates the risks of insuring a particular person ...
  9. Earnings Per Share - EPS

    The portion of a company's profit allocated to each outstanding share of common ...
  10. Ltd. (Limited)

    An abbreviation of "limited," Ltd. is a suffix that follows the name ...
Related Articles
  1. Evaluating Your Stock Broker
    Brokers

    Evaluating Your Stock Broker

  2. Choosing A Compatible Broker
    Retirement

    Choosing A Compatible Broker

  3. Is Your Broker Acting In Your Best Interest?
    Brokers

    Is Your Broker Acting In Your Best Interest?

  4. 10 Tips For Choosing An Online Broker
    Options & Futures

    10 Tips For Choosing An Online Broker

  5. How To Invest In Corporate Spin-offs
    Chart Advisor

    How To Invest In Corporate Spin-offs

  6. Wall Street’s Glass Ceiling
    Professionals

    Wall Street’s Glass Ceiling

  7. Top 4 Most Competitive Financial Careers
    Professionals

    Top 4 Most Competitive Financial Careers

  8. Operating Profit
    Investing

    Operating Profit

  9. Current Assets
    Investing Basics

    Current Assets

  10. Learn How To Invest Defensively From ...
    Investing News

    Learn How To Invest Defensively From ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Genuine Progress Indicator - GPI

    A metric used to measure the economic growth of a country. It is often considered as a replacement to the more well known gross domestic product (GDP) economic indicator. The GPI indicator takes everything the GDP uses into account, but also adds other figures that represent the cost of the negative effects related to economic activity (such as the cost of crime, cost of ozone depletion and cost of resource depletion, among others).
  2. Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR

    A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding shares of their stock. The accelerated share repurchase (ASR) is usually accomplished by the corporation purchasing shares of its stock from an investment bank. The investment bank borrows the shares from clients or share lenders and sells them to the company.
  3. Microeconomic Pricing Model

    A model of the way prices are set within a market for a given good. According to this model, prices are set based on the balance of supply and demand in the market. In general, profit incentives are said to resemble an "invisible hand" that guides competing participants to an equilibrium price. The demand curve in this model is determined by consumers attempting to maximize their utility, given their budget.
  4. Centralized Market

    A financial market structure that consists of having all orders routed to one central exchange with no other competing market. The quoted prices of the various securities listed on the exchange represent the only price that is available to investors seeking to buy or sell the specific asset.
  5. Balanced Investment Strategy

    A portfolio allocation and management method aimed at balancing risk and return. Such portfolios are generally divided equally between equities and fixed-income securities.
  6. Negative Carry

    A situation in which the cost of holding a security exceeds the yield earned. A negative carry situation is typically undesirable because it means the investor is losing money. An investor might, however, achieve a positive after-tax yield on a negative carry trade if the investment comes with tax advantages, as might be the case with a bond whose interest payments were nontaxable.
Trading Center