Brokerage Supervisor

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DEFINITION of 'Brokerage Supervisor'

A brokerage company employee who appoints, trains and manages brokers and who sells the company's products to those brokers, who then sell them to clients. The brokerage supervisor must also ensure company service standards and manage workflow processes. Brokerage supervisors can work in several fields, as several different types of businesses use the brokerage company format, including insurance, real estate and financial products.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brokerage Supervisor'

A good brokerage supervisor should have attention to detail, solid mathematical skills, an accounting background, leadership ability, strong customer service skills and previous experience with commission sales.

Some brokerage supervisors who fail to properly supervise their brokers (such as by conducting formal annual audits) and who fail to establish and/or enforce the insurance company's policies are subject to enforcement action by the Securities and Exchange commission if the broker engages in fraud. Such enforcement actions may include fines and being barred from holding a supervisor position in the insurance and financial industry.

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