Brokerage Window

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Brokerage Window'

The ability to direct trading within a brokerage's offering through a retirement plan such as a 401(k). As opposed to being limited to the investment options within a sponsored 401(k), some investors have the option to set up a "window", which allows them to trade most listed stocks, mutual funds and exchange-traded funds.

May also be known as a "self-directed account" (SDA) or "self-directed brokerage account" (SDBA).


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brokerage Window'

The brokerage window is a relatively new convention, but it is quickly gaining popularity as more companies give the option to their employees. While the freedoms of a brokerage window are too much for some investors to consider, it is a viable option for those who understand the increased risks of individual security selection and asset allocation.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Systematic Risk

    The risk inherent to the entire market or entire market segment. ...
  2. Speculative Risk

    A category of risk that, when undertaken, results in an uncertain ...
  3. Tax Deferred

    Investment earnings such as interest, dividends or capital gains ...
  4. Brokerage Account

    An arrangement between an investor and a licensed brokerage firm ...
  5. 401(k) Plan

    A qualified plan established by employers to which eligible employees ...
  6. Exchange Traded Derivative

    A financial instrument whose value is based on the value of another ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Who bears the investment risk in 401(k) plans?

    Who actually bears the investment risk in a pension plan depends on the type of pension plan that is employed. In a broad ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why would a company issue a rights offering?

    Companies most commonly issue a rights offering to raise additional capital. A company may need extra capital to meet its ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between share purchase rights and options?

    There is a big difference between share purchase rights and options. With share purchase rights, the holder may or may not ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. In what ways can a sinking fund affect bond returns?

    The effective yield of a bond sinking fund to an investor should not be considered similar to a bond nonsinking fund. Both ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do no-load funds typically perform relative to load funds?

    No-load mutual funds are pooled investments that do not carry an upfront sales charge when purchased or a deferred sales ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    An Introduction To The Roth 401(k)

    The money that you earn today is taxed today, making tax-free retirement withdrawals a reality.
  2. Taxes

    Learn about eligibility requirements, contributions and distribution rules for these retirement plans.
  3. Professionals

    Help Parents Avoid This Retirement Savings Blunder

    Parents should make saving for their own retirement a priority over helping with their children’s college costs.
  4. Investing

    Financial Gifts For Grads: Kindergarten To College

    If you really want to help your grad preparing for the future, consider a present that supports their long-term goals—an early start to financial planning.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Why You May Want To Be (And Stay) In Bonds

    Bonds are complicated, and it’s easy to feel intimidated or confused. Fortunately, you don’t need to be a numbers geek to be an informed investor.
  6. Professionals

    5 Signs That You Have a Lousy 401(k) Plan

    Knowing whether a 401(k) plan is good or not so good is important. This will help participants decide how much to invest and when to demand improvements.
  7. Entrepreneurship

    Why Small Business Owners Need Financial Advisors

    Small business owners are too busy to effectively manage their own money. That's why a financial advisor can be a big help.
  8. Investing

    What More Volatility Means For Momentum Stocks

    One byproduct of the recent tick higher in bond yields: a meaningful rise in volatility for both stocks and bonds.
  9. Professionals

    401(k) Risks Advisors Should Know About

    Lawsuits are challenging the the fiduciary duty of plan sponsors related to 401(k) fees. Here's what financial advisers should know.
  10. Professionals

    Why Doing Your Taxes is Good Retirement Planning

    Income tax time is a great time to reevaluate retirement planning, since all the information you need is right at your fingertips.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  2. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  3. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  4. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  5. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
  6. Risk Premium

    The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is ...
Trading Center