Brokerage Account


DEFINITION of 'Brokerage Account'

An arrangement between an investor and a licensed brokerage firm that allows the investor to deposit funds with the firm and place investment orders through the brokerage, which then carries out the transactions on the investor's behalf. The investor owns the assets contained in the brokerage account and must usually claim as income any capital gains he or she incurs from the account.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Brokerage Account'

There are several different types of brokerage accounts and brokerage firms; investors are able to choose the type of brokerage account and broker that best suits their financial requirements. Some full-service brokers provide extensive investment advice, charging high fees for their efforts, while most online brokers simply provide a secure interface through which investors can place trade orders and, therefore, charge relatively low fees for their services. Brokerage accounts can also differ in terms of order execution speed, analysis tools used, scope of tradable assets, and the extent to which investors can trade on margin.

  1. Full-Service Broker

    A broker that provides a large variety of services to its clients, ...
  2. Margin Account

    A brokerage account in which the broker lends the customer cash ...
  3. Broker

    1. An individual or firm that charges a fee or commission for ...
  4. Discount Broker

    A stockbroker who carries out buy and sell orders at a reduced ...
  5. Suspense Account

    In accounting, the section of a company's books where unclassified ...
  6. Financial Supermarket

    An institution or company that offers a wide range of financial ...
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