Brown Bag Meeting

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DEFINITION of 'Brown Bag Meeting'

An informal meeting that takes place over lunch. This type of meeting is called a brown bag meeting because participants provide their own lunches. In the business world, a brown bag meeting would take place in the office, probably in the conference room. Brown bag meetings save companies money because they don't have to supply food or drink for the attendees. If a business wants to host a more formal meeting, it might do so at a classy restaurant and pay for every participant's food and drink.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Brown Bag Meeting'

Participants in a brown bag meeting are allowed and expected to eat whatever food they bring in during the meeting. Brown bag meetings are not limited to the business world; they may also be used by universities, for example, as a casual way to host a speaker or hold a discussion during students' lunch hour.

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