Budget Planning Calendar

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DEFINITION of 'Budget Planning Calendar'

A schedule of activities that must be completed in order to create and develop a budget. Budget planning calendars are necessary for the creation of complex budgets used by large organizations. These organizations must usually harvest a great deal of data from several departments, thus requiring a calendar to coordinate when the final numbers from each department are submitted.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Budget Planning Calendar'

Budget planning calendars can cover a period of several months in some cases. They usually include the specific dates when departments must submit their data to the accounting department. These calendars can also take several months to prepare in and of themselves.

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