Building And Personal Property Coverage Form

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DEFINITION of 'Building And Personal Property Coverage Form'

The document that details the provisions of a type of business insurance policy designed to cover direct physical damage or loss to a covered commercial property and many of its contents. The form defines what property is covered (e.g., building, fixtures, personal property), what property is not covered (e.g., cash, animals, contraband), what types of losses are covered (e.g., fire, vandalism), additional coverages (e.g., debris removal), exclusions and limitations, insurance limits and deductibles.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Building And Personal Property Coverage Form'

It is important that the policyholder read the building and personal property coverage form when the policy is taken out to make sure everything important is covered. If the policy is inadequate, it is often possible to purchase additional coverage. The form also describes the conditions that must be met for the policy to be valid.

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