Bullet Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Bullet Bond'

A debt instrument whose entire face value is paid at once on the maturity date. Bullet bonds are non-callable. Bullet bonds cannot be redeemed early by an issuer, so they pay a relatively low rate of interest because of the issuer's exposure to interest-rate risk. Both corporations and governments issue bullet bonds, and bullet bonds come in a variety of maturities, from short- to long-term. A portfolio made up of bullet bonds is called a bullet portfolio.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bullet Bond'

A bullet bond is considered riskier than an amortizing bond because it gives the issuer a large repayment obligation on a single date rather than a series of smaller repayment obligations spread over several dates. As a result, issuers who are relatively new to the market or who have less than excellent credit ratings may attract more investors with an amortizing bond than with a bullet bond.

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