Bullion Market

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DEFINITION of 'Bullion Market'

A forum through which buyers and sellers trade pure gold and silver. The bullion market is open 24 hours a day and is primarily an over-the-counter market, with most trading based in London. The bullion market has a high turnover rate and most transactions are conducted electronically or by phone. Gold and silver derive their value from their industrial and commercial uses; they can also act as a hedge against inflation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bullion Market'

The bullion market is just one of several ways to invest in gold and silver. Other options include exchange-traded funds, futures, options and mutual funds; these can be more appealing to investors, because they offer greater flexibility. Bullion offers less trading flexibility than other gold and silver investments, because it is a tangible object that comes in bars and coins of established sizes, which can be difficult to buy or sell in specific amounts. Bullion is also expensive to store and insure.

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