Bullet

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bullet'

1) A one-time lump-sum repayment of an outstanding loan, typically made by the borrower after very little, if any, amortization of the loan. This can also refer to a loan that requires a disproportionately large portion (or even all) of the loan to be repaid at maturity.

2) A slang term for a letter of rejection sent to a job applicant, informing the candidate that he or she has not been offered the job, has been denied an interview or some similar form of rejection.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bullet'

1) Loans can have provisions built into them upon issuance to allow borrowers to make a one-time lump-sum repayment of the loan at their discretion. This option can prove useful for borrowers, particularly if their financial situation significantly changes for the better shortly after the loan is issued. For example, an early lump-sum repayment can considerably lower the interest expense accrued over the course of the loan.

2) Companies typically send out bullet letters once they have filled the position they had available, or (if the bullet letter denies an interview) once the company has selected its entire interview pool. In other cases, a company may simply state in the job advertisement that it will only contact applicants who are selected for an interview.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Lump-Sum Distribution

    A one-time payment for the entire amount due, rather than breaking ...
  2. Bullet Repayment

    A lump sum payment for the entire loan amount paid at maturity. ...
  3. Bullet Bond

    A debt instrument whose entire face value is paid at once on ...
  4. Repayment

    The act of paying back money previously borrowed from a lender. ...
  5. Balloon Maturity

    1. A repayment schedule for a bond issue where a large number ...
  6. Bullet GIC

    A type of guaranteed investment contract where a single payment ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why does the majority of my mortgage payment start out as interest and gradually ...

    When you make a mortgage payment, the amount paid is a combination of an interest charge and principal repayment. Over the ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. I've come into a large amount of money. Should I invest it or pay off my mortgage?

    There is no simple answer to this question as it depends on a number of key factors, namely the aspects or criteria of your ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where can I find year-to-date (YTD) returns for benchmarks?

    Benchmarks are securities or groups of securities against which investment performance is analyzed. Examples of popular equity ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Under what circumstances would someone enter into a repurchase agreement?

    In finance, a repurchase agreement represents a contract between two parties, where one party sells a security to the other ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What type of asset allocation should I use if I am already retired?

    Among investors, asset allocation is a topic of discussion that receives a great deal of weight during the asset accumulation ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Avoiding Foreclosure Scams

    If you want to save your home, avoid bogus offers and take matters into your own hands.
  2. Home & Auto

    Option ARMs: American Dream Or Mortgage Nightmare?

    Option adjustable rate mortgages could make or break your home-buying experience.
  3. Retirement

    Lump Sum Versus Regular Pension Payments

    If you're about to retire, you may be facing this dilemma soon. Find out what your options are.
  4. Savings

    Explaining Term Deposits

    A term deposit (more often called a certificate of deposit or CD) is a deposit account that is made for a specific period of time.
  5. Economics

    What's a Maturity Date?

    Maturity date is the final date when any remaining principal and any unpaid interest are due on a debt.
  6. Credit & Loans

    Calculating Interest Expense

    Interest expense is the cost of borrowing money.
  7. Professionals

    Worried About Stocks? Try on Convertibles

    Convertibles are a good hedge against equity market risk (if you're o.k. with losing a bit of upside potential).
  8. Stock Analysis

    Playing Rising Rates with Ultra-Short Term Bonds

    With rising rates likely, investors may want to consider adding a dose of ultra-short bonds to their portfolios. Here are some ETFs to consider.
  9. Professionals

    Why Investors Are Bailing on Bond ETFs

    Investors are fleeing bond ETFs. Should you follow the herd? Hint: It depends on the type of bond.
  10. Professionals

    Is a Bond Market Selloff Coming?

    A big investment management company is concerned about bond market conditions and allocating more capital to cash. Should you follow?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!