Buoyant

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DEFINITION of 'Buoyant'

The term used to describe a commodities market where the prices generally rise with ease when there are considerable signals of strength.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Buoyant'

These types of markets can be very volatile as the prices are rapid to rise and fall with investor sentiment.

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