U.S. Bureau Of Engraving And Printing - BEP

DEFINITION of 'U.S. Bureau Of Engraving And Printing - BEP'

A U.S. government agency responsible for printing the paper currency, Treasury securities and specialty documents for the United States. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is part of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. The BEP designs all paper currency, which it sends to the Federal Reserve for use in the money supply.

BREAKING DOWN 'U.S. Bureau Of Engraving And Printing - BEP'

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing was formed in 1862. It has offices in Washington, DC., as well as Fort Worth, Texas. While widely-known for its role in the printing of money, the agency also provides assistance to other agencies in the design of security documents, such as passports and identification cards.


Coins are not produced at the BEP; they are produced at the United States Mint.

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