Bureau Of Public Debt

DEFINITION of 'Bureau Of Public Debt'

An agency of the United States Department of the Treasury that is responsible for borrowing funds for the federal government to use, maintaining accounts of the government's outstanding debts and providing services to other federal government agencies. The Bureau of Public Debt obtains debt financing for the government by selling fixed-income securities, such as Treasury bills, bonds, notes and similar types of debt instruments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bureau Of Public Debt'

The Bureau of Public Debt borrows about $5 trillion dollars worth of funds every year for the federal government. It manages to do this through over 200 auctions of marketable securities each year, in which investors bid for the securities as they are released by the government. The Bureau of Public Debt has over 40,000 offices located throughout the U.S. to facilitate the auctions and sales of its debt securities to the public.

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