Burnout

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Burnout'

A period of slowing mortgage prepayment within a mortgage backed security (MBS). This usually occurs after the mortgages start to mature. When some percentage of the underlying loans fail to prepay after an interest rate cycle, this is known as burnout. Those borrowers who did not refinance during the first interest rate cycle are less like to do so if interest rates drop again.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Burnout'

The rate at which the underlying loans of an MBS prepay is largely a function of current interest rates relative to the interest rates on the underlying loans. If current interest rates fall to a certain point below the interest rate on an existing mortgage, borrowers have an incentive to refinance. An MBS can go through several cycles of interest rates over its term. Prepayment risk is a substantial risk for investors in MBSs and investors look for MBSs with burnout because burnout lessens the prepayment risks.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Pool Factor

    The percentage of the original principal that is left to be distributed ...
  2. Prepayment

    The satisfaction of a debt or installment payment before its ...
  3. Prepayment Risk

    The risk associated with the early unscheduled return of principal ...
  4. Mortgage-Backed Security (MBS)

    A type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage ...
  5. Ginnie Mae Pass Through

    A type of investment issued by the Government National Mortgage ...
  6. Agency Swap Program

    A form of securitization whereby single-family residential mortgages ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a Ginnie Mae security?

    A Ginnie Mae, or Government National Mortgage Association security, functions similarly to the process of lending someone ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) exchanged?

    American depositary receipts (ADRs) are bought and sold on regular U.S. stock exchanges, either in the over-the-counter market ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Who or what is backing municipal bonds?

    Municipal bonds are backed by dedicated taxes or revenue sources related to specific projects, or by the full faith and credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the differences between debt and equity markets?

    The basic differences between the debt and equity markets include the type of financial interest they represent, the way ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does it signify if the term structure of an interest rate's curve is positive?

    When the term structure of interest rates is positive, it is a signal to economists the short-term yields on similar bonds ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Profit From Mortgage Debt With MBS

    Mortgage-backed securities can offer monthly income, a fixed interest rate and even government backing.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What are Floating-Rate Notes?

    A floating-rate note is a debt instrument with an interest rate that “floats,” or varies. They are also called floaters.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 ETFs For Investing in Brazil

    Discover information and analysis of some of the most popular and best performing exchange-traded funds that offer investors exposure to Brazil.
  4. Investing

    Where Are Real Estate Stocks Heading?

    We summarize five economic reports that investors should monitor monthly to keep them informed of where real estate and its related stocks are heading.
  5. Investing

    Looking for Alternatives to Invest in Real Estate?

    There are several ways to invest in “real estate” via the stock market, buying stocks and hold them for years. We give you 5 ways to invest in real estate.
  6. Investing

    Five Portfolio Moves For The Second Half

    After a relatively calm few months, market volatility is back. If you are an investor, we help you prepare your portfolio with these five portfolio moves.
  7. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Junk Bonds: Does High Yield Equal Extreme Risk?

    High-yield bonds present a lot of risks but do they outweigh the rewards? Here are some ETFs to consider, with caution.
  8. Professionals

    Want to Diversify? 'Go Alternative,' Advisors Say

    Alternative investments are great for diversification, but some advisors remain a bit wary of them, a new Pershing study says.
  9. Economics

    How An Aging World Can Impact Your Portfolio

    It can be easy for investors to lose sight of longer-term, structural developments in favor of more ephemeral trends and fads in the financial markets.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    A Look at How Currency-Hedged ETFs Work

    Currency-hedged ETFs come in two varieties: single-currency and multiple-currency. Which is right for you?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  2. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  3. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  4. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  5. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
  6. Touchline

    The highest price that a buyer of a particular security is willing to pay and the lowest price at which a seller is willing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!