Bush Tax Cuts

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bush Tax Cuts'

A series of temporary income tax relief measures enacted by President George W. Bush in 2001 and 2003. The tax cuts lowered federal income tax rates for everyone, decreased the marriage penalty, lowered capital gains taxes, lowered the tax rate on dividend income, increased the child tax credit from $500 to $1,000 per child, eliminated the phaseout on personal exemptions for higher-income taxpayers and eliminated the phaseout on itemized deductions and eliminated the estate tax.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bush Tax Cuts'

Because the tax cuts were in place for so many years, they began to feel permanent rather than temporary, and taxpayers and politicians raised a major outcry as their expiration date approached. Those who wanted to let the tax cuts expire as scheduled argued that the government needed the extra tax revenue in the face of massive its budget deficits. Those who wanted to extend the tax cuts or make them permanent argued that because taxes reduce economic growth and stifle entrepreneurship and incentives to work, effectively increasing taxes during a recession was a bad idea.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Income Tax

    A tax that governments impose on financial income generated by ...
  2. Adjusted Gross Income - AGI

    A measure of income used to determine how much of your income ...
  3. Progressive Tax

    A tax that takes a larger percentage from the income of high-income ...
  4. Capital Gain

    1. An increase in the value of a capital asset (investment or ...
  5. Tax Rate

    The percentage at which an individual or corporation is taxed. ...
  6. Withholding Tax

    1. Income tax withheld from employees' wages and paid directly ...
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Talk Is Cheap: Campaign Promises And The Economy

    A president's campaign trail promises often come up against economic reality.
  2. Taxes

    Spoil Your Grandkids, Cut Your Tax Bill

    Helping your grandchildren save for college is a way to spoil them and reap some benefits yourself.
  3. Taxes

    Do Tax Cuts Stimulate The Economy?

    Learn the logic behind the belief that reducing government income benefits everyone.
  4. Taxes

    Should The U.S. Switch To A Flat Tax?

    Some countries have begun charging a flat tax rate instead of the gradual tax system of the Western world.
  5. Taxes

    Capital Gains Tax Cuts For Middle Income Investors

    Find out how TIPRA plans to slash taxes for those in the 10-15% tax bracket.
  6. Taxes

    How to Tell if You Need an Estate Planning Lawyer

    Estate planning is an important and often neglected part of financial planning, which can be costly when avoided or done improperly.
  7. Economics

    Will North and South Korea Ever Reunite?

    North and South Korea have been divided for over six decades. Some analysts think the two countries could reunify within the next 10 years.
  8. Economics

    The Top 9 Things to Know About Hillary Clinton's Economic View

    Find out where former secretary of state and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stands on the economy, jobs, trade and education.
  9. Economics

    Is Argentina a Socialist Country?

    Find out why it does not really make sense to call Argentina a socialist country, even though the South American nation has many socialistic tendencies.
  10. Retirement

    Inherited IRA and 401(k) Rules: Don't Run Afoul

    What you need to know when it comes to the complex rules for inherited IRAs and 401(k)s.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are spousal Social Security benefits taxable?

    Your spousal Social Security benefits may be taxable, depending on your total household income for the year. About one-third ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do you calculate penalties on an IRA or Roth IRA early withdrawal?

    With a few exceptions, early withdrawals from traditional or Roth IRAs generally incur a tax penalty equal to 10% of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are credit card rewards taxable?

    Credit card rewards are taxable in the United States some of the time. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) classifies credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Where are the Social Security administration headquarters?

    The U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is headquartered in Woodlawn, Maryland, a suburb just outside of Baltimore. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the Social Security tax rate?

    The Social Security tax rate is 12.4% as of 2015. Of that amount, the employee is responsible for half, or 6.2%, and the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the Social Security administration responsible for?

    The main responsibility of the U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is overseeing the country's Social Security program. ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  2. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  3. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  4. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  5. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
  6. Wedding Warrant

    A warrant that can only be exercised if the host asset, typically a bond or preferred stock, is surrendered. Until the call ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!