Bush Tax Cuts

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bush Tax Cuts'

A series of temporary income tax relief measures enacted by President George W. Bush in 2001 and 2003. The tax cuts lowered federal income tax rates for everyone, decreased the marriage penalty, lowered capital gains taxes, lowered the tax rate on dividend income, increased the child tax credit from $500 to $1,000 per child, eliminated the phaseout on personal exemptions for higher-income taxpayers and eliminated the phaseout on itemized deductions and eliminated the estate tax.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bush Tax Cuts'

Because the tax cuts were in place for so many years, they began to feel permanent rather than temporary, and taxpayers and politicians raised a major outcry as their expiration date approached. Those who wanted to let the tax cuts expire as scheduled argued that the government needed the extra tax revenue in the face of massive its budget deficits. Those who wanted to extend the tax cuts or make them permanent argued that because taxes reduce economic growth and stifle entrepreneurship and incentives to work, effectively increasing taxes during a recession was a bad idea.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Adjusted Gross Income - AGI

    A measure of income used to determine how much of your income ...
  2. Capital Gain

    1. An increase in the value of a capital asset (investment or ...
  3. Federal Tax Brackets

    Income tax groupings specified by the Internal Revenue Service ...
  4. Tax Rate

    The percentage at which an individual or corporation is taxed. ...
  5. After-Tax Income

    The amount of money that an individual or company has left over ...
  6. Withholding Tax

    1. Income tax withheld from employees' wages and paid directly ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Can I get a tax credit from conducting research and development?

    It is possible for a company to qualify for a research and development tax credit for conducting research and development. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the main risks to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy ...

    The main risk to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy of austerity is the potential for a self-reinforcing, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the major laws (acts) regulating financial institutions that were created ...

    Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, in conjunction with Congress, signed into law several major legislative responses ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How should a whistleblower report unlawful or unethical behavior?

    Whistleblowing takes many forms. A whistleblower could expose government corruption, expose unethical business behavior or ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the government's role and what is the private sector's role in neoliberalism?

    Neoliberalist economic theory supports minimization of government intervention and laissez-faire policy. Neoliberalism is ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Talk Is Cheap: Campaign Promises And The Economy

    A president's campaign trail promises often come up against economic reality.
  2. Taxes

    Spoil Your Grandkids, Cut Your Tax Bill

    Helping your grandchildren save for college is a way to spoil them and reap some benefits yourself.
  3. Taxes

    Do Tax Cuts Stimulate The Economy?

    Learn the logic behind the belief that reducing government income benefits everyone.
  4. Taxes

    Should The U.S. Switch To A Flat Tax?

    Some countries have begun charging a flat tax rate instead of the gradual tax system of the Western world.
  5. Taxes

    Capital Gains Tax Cuts For Middle Income Investors

    Find out how TIPRA plans to slash taxes for those in the 10-15% tax bracket.
  6. Economics

    What is a Resident Alien?

    A resident alien is a foreigner who is a permanent resident of the country in which he or she resides but does not have citizenship.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Protectionism

    Protectionism is government measures that limit imports into a country to protect commerce within that country against foreign competition.
  8. Taxes

    Have Household Help? Don't Get In Tax Trouble

    Hiring household workers can be a complicated process. Know what the government requires so you can prevent penalties and problems down the road.
  9. Taxes

    Estate Planning for a Surviving Spouse

    Estate planning for surviving spouses can be difficult for a number of reasons, so it's important to have good support and financial advice.
  10. Professionals

    Gay Marriage Ruling: Its Impact on Estate Planning

    Same-sex couples now face the same legal and financial issues as heterosexual couples; some may need to adopt simpler, more mainstream financial plans.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!