Business Auto Coverage Form

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DEFINITION of 'Business Auto Coverage Form'

A form that insurers provide to business owners when creating a contract to provide insurance coverage for the company's cars, trucks, trailers, vans or other vehicles. The form is divided into five sections that define the coverage, including the types of vehicles, causes of damage and types of damage covered, in addition to both the insurer's and business's obligations in the event that damage occurs.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Auto Coverage Form'

The business auto coverage form helps businesses review the different coverage options available to them, enabling them to select coverage that meets their company's needs while keeping costs to a minimum. Coverage may include vehicles that are owned or leased by the company or its employees.

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