Business Automobile Policy - BAP

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DEFINITION of 'Business Automobile Policy - BAP'

An insurance policy that covers a company's use of cars, trucks, vans and other vehicles in the course of carrying out its business. Coverage may include vehicles owned or leased by the company, hired by the company, or employee-owned vehicles used for business purposes.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Automobile Policy - BAP'

It is recommended that a company obtain a business automobile policy even if it does not own vehicles if its employees use personal vehicles for business purposes. In the event of a serious accident the employee may not have enough personal liability coverage to adequately protect the business.



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