Business Process Redesign - BPR

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DEFINITION of 'Business Process Redesign - BPR'

The complete overhaul of a key business process with the objective of achieving a quantum jump in performance measures such as return on investment, cost reduction and quality of service. Business processes that can be redesigned encompass the complete range of critical processes, from manufacturing and production, to sales and customer service. Also known as business process reengineering.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Process Redesign - BPR'

Two criticisms of business process redesign are - (1) it may entail a large number of job redundancies or layoffs, and (2) it assumes that faulty business processes are the main reason for the company's poor performance, when other factors may also be responsible for under-performance.

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