Business Segment Reporting

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Business Segment Reporting'

Giving separate accounts of a company's individual divisions, subsidiaries or other segments. In an annual report, the purpose of business segment reporting is to provide an accurate picture of a public company's performance to its shareholders. For upper management, business segment reporting is used to evaluate each segment's income, expenses, assets, liabilities and so on in order to assess profitability and riskiness.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Segment Reporting'

A bank, for example, might use business segment reporting to separately account for its banking, credit card and financial services segments. If the bank had operations in both North America and Latin America, it might report on those separately as well.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Shareholder

    Any person, company or other institution that owns at least one ...
  2. Business Process Outsourcing - ...

    A method of subcontracting various business-related operations ...
  3. Wholly Owned Subsidiary

    A company whose common stock is 100% owned by another company, ...
  4. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
  5. Subsidiary

    A company whose voting stock is more than 50% controlled by another ...
  6. Business Risk

    The possibility that a company will have lower than anticipated ...
Related Articles
  1. how to read a company's footnotes.
    Fundamental Analysis

    Financial Footnotes: Start Reading The Fine Print

    Find out what could be hidden in this often-overlooked part of the financial statements.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    January: Time To Read Your Mutual Fund's Annual Report

    Don't let this valuable piece of mail end up in your trash can. Here are five things you need to know.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Digging Deeper: The Mutual Fund Prospectus

    The legal jargon of this document can be daunting. Find out how to get to the important stuff.
  4. Markets

    Your Dividend Payout: Can You Count On It?

    We go over several telling factors that can help you answer this question and avoid losses.
  5. Delivery duty paid (DDP) is a shipping term.
    Investing

    What does DDP Mean?

    Delivery duty paid (DDP) is a shipping term specifying that the seller is responsible for all costs associated with delivery of the goods to the buyer. It is usually used when goods are exported ...
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a good interest coverage ratio?

    Learn the importance of the interest coverage ratio, one of the primary debt ratios analysts use to evaluate a company's financial health.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a bad interest coverage ratio?

    Understand how interest coverage ratio is calculated and what it signifies, and learn what market analysts consider to be an unacceptably low coverage ratio.
  8. Active Trading Fundamentals

    What is liquidity risk?

    Learn how to distinguish between the two broad types of financial liquidity risk: funding liquidity risk and market liquidity risk.
  9. Technical Indicators

    What is a good gearing ratio?

    Understand the meaning of the gearing ratio, how it is calculated, the definition of high and low gearing, and how they reflect relative financial stability.
  10. Investing Basics

    What is considered to be a bad gearing ratio?

    Understand the basics of gearing, including the net gearing ratio, what constitutes a bad gearing ratio and how this figure reflects financial stability.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Santa Claus Rally

    A surge in the price of stocks that often occurs in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day. There are numerous explanations ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  3. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  4. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  5. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  6. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
Trading Center