Business Valuation

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DEFINITION of 'Business Valuation'

The process of determining the economic value of a business or company. Business valuation can be used to determine the fair value of a business for a variety of reasons, including sale value, establishing partner ownership and divorce proceedings. Often times, owners will turn to professional business valuators for an objective estimate of the business value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Valuation'

The field of business valuation encompasses a wide array of fields and methods. The tools and methods can vary between valuators, businesses and industries. Common approaches to business valuation include review of financial statements, discounting cash flow models, and similar company comparisons.

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