Business Judgment Rule

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DEFINITION of 'Business Judgment Rule'

A regulation that helps to make sure a corporation's board of directors is protected from misleading allegations about the way it conducts business. Unless it is apparent that the board of directors has blatantly violated some major rule of conduct, the courts will not review or question its decisions or dealings.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Judgment Rule'

The reason for this rule is to acknowledge that the daily operation of a business can be innately risky and controversial. Therefore, the board of directors should be allowed to make decisions without fear of being prosecuted. The business judgment rule further assumes that it is unfair to expect those managing a company to make perfect decisions all the time. As long as the courts believe that the board of directors acted rationally in a particular situation, no further action will taken against them.

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