Buy And Hold

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DEFINITION of 'Buy And Hold'

A passive investment strategy in which an investor buys stocks and holds them for a long period of time, regardless of fluctuations in the market. An investor who employs a buy-and-hold strategy actively selects stocks, but once in a position, is not concerned with short-term price movements and technical indicators.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Buy And Hold'

Conventional investing wisdom tells us that with a long time horizon, equities render a higher return than other asset classes such as bonds. There is, however, a debate over whether a buy-and-hold strategy is actually superior to an active investing strategy; both sides have valid arguments. A buy-and-hold strategy has tax benefits, however, because long-term investments tend to be taxed at a lower rate than short-term investments.

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