Buyers/Sellers On Balance


DEFINITION of 'Buyers/Sellers On Balance'

1. A ratio based on aggregate market orders for securities that tells whether there are more buyers or sellers in the current market. This ratio is usually provided just before the market opens.

2. A term that describes whether an investor has mainly acquired securities or mainly sold securities over a given time period.

BREAKING DOWN 'Buyers/Sellers On Balance'

1. A market with more buyers on balance usually indicates positive investor sentiment, while one with more sellers on balance usually indicates negative investor sentiment.

2. If an investor is a buyer on balance, it is generally a positive sign that they have identified a number of potentially profitable opportunities in the market. If an investor is a seller on balance, this situation could indicate a number of possibilities. The seller might have multiple investments that have reached profitable selling points, such as previously undervalued securities that have increased in price. The seller might also be unloading investments out of distress or fear.

  1. Imbalance of Orders

    A situation when too many orders of a particular type - either ...
  2. Order Imbalance

    A situation resulting from an excess of buy or sell orders for ...
  3. Market Depth

    The market's ability to sustain relatively large market orders ...
  4. Thin Market

    A market with a low number of buyers and sellers. Since few transactions ...
  5. Market-On-Close Order - MOC

    A non-limit (market) order executed as close to the end of the ...
  6. Held At The Opening

    A situation in which a security is restricted from trading when ...
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