When an investor is forced to repurchase shares because the seller did not deliver the securities in a timely fashion, or did not deliver them at all.


Those who fail to deliver the securities will be notified with a buy-in notice. Failure to answer the buy-in notice means the broker can buy the securities and deliver them on your behalf. You must then pay back the broker at whatever price.

  1. Security

    A financial instrument that represents an ownership position ...
  2. Sell-Out

    When a broker or investor buying stocks has failed to settle ...
  3. Share Repurchase

    A program by which a company buys back its own shares from the ...
  4. Employee Stock Option - ESO

    A stock option granted to specified employees of a company. ESOs ...
  5. Bid Wanted

    An announcement by an investor who holds a security that he or ...
  6. Hindsight Bias

    A psychological phenomenon in which past events seem to be more ...
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