Buying Forward

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DEFINITION of 'Buying Forward'

An investment strategy that involves the buying of money market instruments or currencies in anticipation of a price rise or a future increase in demand. When there is anticipation or an expectation of a rise in security prices, or an increase in the demand levels of a particular currency, buying forward allows an investor to take advantage of future and potential profits by buying now, at a lower price, and selling when prices rise.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Buying Forward'

The opposite of buying forward is selling forward. If an investor believes that the price of a security or the demand of a currency is going to drop, selling forward can help the investor mitigate loss because he or she is selling now, while the price is still high as opposed to selling at a loss when prices drop.

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