Buying Hedge

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DEFINITION of 'Buying Hedge'

A transaction that commodities investors undertake to hedge against possible increases in the prices of the actuals underlying the futures contracts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Buying Hedge'

Also called a long hedge, this particular strategy protects investors from increasing prices by means of purchasing futures contracts. Many companies will attempt to use a long hedge strategy in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with future prices.

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