C Corporation

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DEFINITION of 'C Corporation'

A legal structure that businesses can choose to organize themselves under in order to limit their owners' legal and financial liabilities. C corporations are legally considered separate entities from their owners. In a C corporation, income is taxed at the corporate level and is taxed again when it is distributed to owners.

BREAKING DOWN 'C Corporation'

C corporations are an alternative to S corporations, where profits pass through to owners and are only taxed at the individual level, and limited liability companies, which provide the legal protections of corporations but are taxed like sole proprietorships. While the double taxation of C corporations is a drawback, the ability to reinvest profits in the company at a lower corporate tax rate is an advantage. Most corporations are C corporations.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can a Limited Liability Company (LLC) issue stock?

    A limited liability company, or LLC, cannot issue stock. Instead, an LLC is structured to have single or multiple owners ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why are corporations so concerned about their stock price?

    When the share price of a company is high or increasing, generally corporations, or more specifically their management teams, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can a corporation deduct dividend payments to shareholders before taxes are calculated?

    Corporations may not legally deduct the dividend payments before taxes but there is another approach - a corporate structure ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. In what instances does overhead qualify for certain tax allowances?

    Businesses are just as keen as anyone else to keep their tax burdens low by any means possible. Overhead expenses often qualify ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When might an abatement be granted by the IRS?

    The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) frequently imposes interest and penalties due to the late filing of a tax return, underpayment ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How is residual value of assets taxed?

    Residual value has several meanings, each with its own potential tax consequences. Tax laws vary between jurisdictions, so ... Read Full Answer >>

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